MOBILITY AND TRANSPORT
European Road Safety Charter
Good Practice

“Let’s Break-Up With the Fake and Sub-Standard Helmets” & Use only ISI Certified Helmets for Two-Wheelers Riders. “Streets for Life # Love30KM/Hrs.”

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“Let’s Break-Up With the Fake and Sub-Standard Helmets” & Use only ISI Certified Helmets for Two-Wheelers Riders. “Streets for Life # Love30KM/Hrs.”

Let’s Break-Up With theFake and Sub-Standard Helmets” & Use only ISI Certified Helmets for Two-Wheelers Riders.
“Streets for Life # Love30KM/Hrs.”
INTRODUCTION:
Today road disaster and harrowing demise of valuable lives in road accidents is very common in India. Evert day one can see these type of heart-rending awful incidents by road users. Due to rapid growth of population, industrialization, urbanization and advanced transport technology more and more vehicles come to road to meet day to day human demands. These days almost every person essentially depends upon the vehicles for routine works. Due to lack of adequate road structural facilities, proper skill in driving and unawareness of traffic rules, “Let’s Break-Up With the Fake and Sub-Standard Helmets” & Use only ISI Certified Helmets for Two-Wheelers Riders.“Streets for Life # Love30KM/Hrs.” we face so many problems and risks in relation to our lives and property.
In India, more than 150,000 people are killed each year in traffic accidents. That’s about 400 fatalities a day and far higher than developed countries in comparison. Now, our Prime Minister Narendra Modiji is attempting to curb the carnage on Indian roads caused by everything from speeding two-wheelers to cars not equipped with proper safety measures. The programme tries to promulgate harsher penalties for traffic offenses and the same has been passed in the lower house of parliament. About 75 to 80 per cent of cars will become compliant with Indian safety norms about a year before they are mandatory. However, it was little relief to note that those killed on the roads in India came down by 4,560 or 3% in 2017 from 1.51 lakh the previous year, the Supreme Court Committee on Road Safety said in a report to the apex court. While Punjab, West Bengal and Gujarat have shown a decline, Bihar, UP, Odisha and MP have reported more deaths.
Road accidents are increasing at a phenomenal rate in Orissa and every year thousands of precious lives are lost due to fatal road mishaps in the State. Twenty one accidents occur every day and seven persons are killed. According to State Transport Authority sources, there were only 16,800 motor vehicles in the State in 1961. But in 2000, the figure went up 51 times to 3, 51,385, whereas the road length has increased by 7.4 per cent only during this period. Official sources said in fact, there are several roads where the vehicular traffic has increased by 4 to 5 times their capacity. Statistics for the last few years show that there is a large increase in the number of accidents from year to year. In 2005, about 7,567 accidents were recorded in the State and at least 2,528 persons died and as many as 10,147 were injured. It is a matter of concern over the increase in road traffic volume, the STA officials point out that old vehicles of more than 15 years of age and young drivers in the age-group of 25 to 30 years are responsible for most of the road accidents in Odisha.
India is a country of villages and more than 80% of its population live in rural areas. The rural people suffer a lot due to their ignorance of traffic rules and road safety measures. They are ignorant of precautions to be taken for handling heavy modern vehicle safety. Children play in the streets by covering the road without any hesitation and the country men walk on the middle of the road in company of others being unaware of the impending disaster. Even the drivers give the traffic rules and regulations ago by unawareness of fatal next moment. Taking intoxicants and using powerful head lights at night vehicles are driven roughly and speedly. Besides over taking the vehicle in a competitive mood is a common phenomenon now-a-days which not only dangers the life of the drivers but also of the life of people who use the road.
It is high time to prioritize road safety education with a focus on issues like drunk driving, driving fast, negligent and rash driving are among the 22 main recommendations highlighted in a report submitted recently to the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways. A working group on road safety education has made the suggestions that assume significance in the wake of increasing fatal accidents on the city roads and highways. Keeping this in view “Women & Child Welfare Society” is arranging “Road Safety Awareness Programme”
https://women-childwelfaresociety.webnode.com/road-safety/
Report:2020-21 https://online.fliphtml5.com/xanlw/bxkm/#p=1
and
“Let’s Break-Up With the Fake and Sub-Standard Helmets” & Use only ISI Certified Helmets for Two-Wheelers Riders.
https://fb.watch/6ZfW55y4fZ/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psR7DA7734U&t=5s
https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/multisite/ersc/content/no-fabrication-no-sa...
“Streets for Life # Love30KM/Hrs.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-r71wOeDUc
https://women-childwelfaresociety.webnode.com/annual-activities/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-r71wOeDUc&t=63s
in different places of Odisha by availing Grant-in-aid from the
• Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Govt. of India, New Delhi
• Regional Transport Authority : Cuttack
• Helmet India Coalition: New Delhi,
• Global Alliance of NGOs for Road Safety, Erik Eriksens Gade 11, 1th 2300 Copenhagen S Denmark
• Indian Alliance of NGOs for Road Safety: New Delhi

What problem did you address/are you addressing? 
Project Executive Summary – Problem: Due to rapid growth of population, industrialization, urbanization and advanced transport technology more and more vehicles come to road to meet day to day human demands. These days almost every person essentially depends upon the vehicles for routine works. Due to lack of adequate road structural facilities, proper skill in driving and unawareness of traffic rules, we face so many problems and risks in relation to our lives and property It's never too early to teach your child to be street smart. All it takes is a little time—time to prepare, plan and teach your child how to be safe on the road. However, problems are to be identified on priority: • High-risk driving • High-risk driving behaviours, like failing to yield, increase our chances of being in a crash. According to police statistics, high-risk driving behaviours contribute to nearly half (43 per cent) of all crashes that result in injuries or deaths. • High-risk driving includes speeding, failing to yield, ignoring traffic control devices, following too closely and improper passing. Failing to yield the right of way is a huge problem: it’s one of the leading causes of crashes that result in injuries or deaths. Intersections are hot spots for failure-to-yield crashes – they’re busy locations where a number of road users need to cross paths and share space. • Pedestrians are perhaps at the greatest risk when drivers fail to yield in intersections. • Signs and traffic signals often help determine who needs to yield to whom. Ignoring traffic-control devices: Remember yellow lights mean you must stop unless it's unsafe to do so. • Following too closely Speeding: You need time to see and react before your brakes take effect and slow you down; reducing your speed gives you more reaction time and less braking distance is required. Each time you double your speed, your braking distance is multiplied by four. In wet or icy road conditions, it’s even more. Speeding reduces your reaction time, and the faster you go, the longer it takes to stop. Speed limits are intended for optimal conditions. The speed you're going should be relative to the road and weather conditions. Distracted driving: Even if you're not using your phone, you may still be distracted. • Any diversion of your attention away from the safe operation of your vehicle, like chatting with passengers, eating or drinking, or adjusting radio or vehicle settings, can contribute to distracted and inattentive driving. We all play a part in making our roads safe – when you're behind the wheel, focus on the road. • If you're looking at your phone, you can't see the road. Checking your phone at a red light may seem harmless, but the truth is using an electronic device behind the wheel is a dangerous distraction. Even when stopped, it affects your situational awareness. You’re five times more likely to crash if you’re using your hand-held phone. Safety and road conditions: We want your time on the road to be safe—whether it’s a short city drive for groceries or a long-distance highway journey. Check our advice on handling many of the situations you could encounter. No body checks road conditions before making a drive.Besides, most of the drivers lack the proper sense of using roundabouts causing fatalities to pedestrians, cyclists and other vehicle drivers. Driving in winter season is quite challenging for thick fog. Even under rainy conditions the front glass becomes smoky causing difficulty to see the road and traffic properly. Improper passing: Passing can be dangerous, especially when your line of sight is obscured. Plan ahead: Getting home safe is a shared responsibility. Take your turn being the designated driver – your friends and family will thank you. If no one is able to be a designated driver, there are still plenty of options for you to get home. Leave your car overnight and consider taking a taxi, transit, or calling a friend. During the winter holidays, Operation Red Nose can also help you get home. • When you drink and drive, you not only risk your life but those of others on the road. With so many options to get home safely, there is no excuse to drive while impaired. Youth drivers and passengers: Youth drivers out of enthusiasm cause terrific mistakes to himself as well as passengers too. Their education and controlling a few restraining behavior is the need of the day. Lack of good examples: Get back to the basics with these simple safety tips. • Look left-right-left and shoulder check before crossing. Make eye contact with drivers and keep looking for approaching vehicles while crossing. • Listen. Remove your headphones so you can hear approaching traffic that may be hard to see. • Be seen. Wear reflective materials or bright clothes and use lights after dark. • Walk on the inside edge of the sidewalk away from the road. If there's no sidewalk - walk facing oncoming traffic, so you can see approaching vehicles. • Never jaywalk. Project Executive Summary - Solution Approach/Activities: In India, more than 150,000 people are killed each year in traffic accidents. That’s about 400 fatalities a day and far higher than developed countries in comparison. Now, our Prime Minister Narendra Modiji is attempting to curb the carnage on Indian roads caused by everything from speeding two-wheelers to cars not equipped with proper safety measures. The programme tries to promulgate harsher penalties for traffic offenses and the same has been passed in the lower house of parliament. About 75 to 80 per cent of cars will become compliant with Indian safety norms about a year before they are mandatory. However, it was little relief to note that those killed on the roads in India came down by 4,560 or 3% in 2017 from 1.51 lakh the previous year, the Supreme Court Committee on Road Safety said in a report to the apex court. While Punjab, West Bengal and Gujarat have shown a decline, Bihar, UP, Odisha and MP have reported more deaths. In India, more than 150,000 people are killed each year in traffic accidents. That’s about 400 fatalities a day and far higher than developed countries in comparison. Now, our Prime Minister Narendra Modiji is attempting to curb the carnage on Indian roads caused by everything from speeding two-wheelers to cars not equipped with proper safety measures. The programme tries to promulgate harsher penalties for traffic offenses and the same has been passed in the lower house of parliament. About 75 to 80 per cent of cars will become compliant with Indian safety norms about a year before they are mandatory. However, it was little relief to note that those killed on the roads in India came down by 4,560 or 3% in 2017 from 1.51 lakh the previous year, the Supreme Court Committee on Road Safety said in a report to the apex court. While Punjab, West Bengal and Gujarat have shown a decline, Bihar, UP, Odisha and MP have reported more deaths. Road accidents are increasing at a phenomenal rate in Orissa and every year thousands of precious lives are lost due to fatal road mishaps in the State. Twenty one accidents occur every day and seven persons are killed. According to State Transport Authority sources, there were only 16,800 motor vehicles in the State in 1961. But in 2000, the figure went up 51 times to 3, 51,385, whereas the road length has increased by 7.4 per cent only during this period. Official sources said in fact, there are several roads where the vehicular traffic has increased by 4 to 5 times their capacity. Statistics for the last few years show that there is a large increase in the number of accidents from year to year. In 2005, about 7,567 accidents were recorded in the State and at least 2,528 persons died and as many as 10,147 were injured. It is a matter of concern over the increase in road traffic volume, the STA officials point out that old vehicles of more than 15 years of age and young drivers in the age-group of 25 to 30 years are responsible for most of the road accidents in Odisha. It is high time to prioritize road safety education with a focus on issues like drunk driving, driving fast, negligent and rash driving are among the 22 main recommendations highlighted in a report submitted recently to the ministry of road transport and highways. A working group on road safety education has made the suggestions that assume significance in the wake of increasing fatal accidents on the city roads and highways. Keeping this in view “Women & Child Welfare Society” is arranging “Road Safety Awareness Programme” in different places of Odisha by availing Grant-in-aid from the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Govt. of India, New Delhi & Regional Transport Authority, Cuttack. Here are the 5 simple ways by which road safety in India can be improved: 1. Proper construction of roads If the roads are constructed with space for pavements, bus bays, and smoother bends, chances for road accidents will be reduced. Ditches are a chronic problem that spoils Indian roads. They should be immediately taken care of. This will considerably reduce the accident rates and extra expenses on road repairs. 2. Implementation of the road safety laws Quite often, road accidents are caused by violation of road safety rules. When rules are strictly implemented, this problem can be solved easily. Placing police officials at various points may not work every time. Instead, you can seek the aid of traffic technologies such as ticket analysers, speed guns, and breath analyzers. 3. Monitoring of roads When you start monitoring the roads through CCTV cameras, certain traffic violations such as violating speed limits, motorcyclists without helmets, people not following road safety rules, etc. can be reduced, as they have a feeling that they are being watched. Otherwise, you can replace obsolete systems with modern traffic solutions. Some of the benefits of using modern technologies in traffic are as follows: • Cost effective • Save energy and manual labour • Smoother operations • Improve road safety • “Let’s Break-Up With the Fake and Sub-Standard Helmets” & Use only ISI Certified Helmets for Two-Wheelers Riders. • “Streets for Life # Love30KM/Hrs.” 4. Quick response time Usually when an accident happens, the response time is too long, which eventually leads to the death of the victim. The system being slow and disorganized, there is a chance for more casualties. If the CCTV cameras are integrated with intelligent solutions, traffic officials will be able to get real-time data and with that information, they can take immediate action at emergency situations. Road safety awareness can also help traffic and transportation departments to smoothly overcome the adverse situations on the road. 5. Phone booths and health centres: Though people have smart phones in their possession, they often face network issue. Poor network is a common issue found in highways. Hence, phone booths can be of great help to people as they can quickly contact the relevant authorities, especially, in the case of accidents. A health centre can be constructed on highways that help to provide first aid to accident victims before admitting them to the hospital. In addition to this, we can also arrange mobile emergency services for highways in order to reduce the road accident rates and thereby, enhance road safety. Implementation of technology on Indian roads can help to have a safe and smoother public transit service.Cities and suburbs are increasing in number, and so is the number of vehicles on the road. Receiving road safety education at the right time will also help to improve road safety. Road safety education must be made a part of school curriculum. Also, conducting awareness programs for people will help you to achieve the road safety goal. 6. Traffic Engineering: We believe Transportation is about people, not just moving vehicles. We are traffic engineers and planners with expertise in traffic operations, circulation studies, traffic signal operations, network & corridor optimization, safety studies and safety audits, crash and conflict analysis. We also specialize in preparing and reviewing impact studies for land developments, access management studies, traffic calming and neighborhood traffic management, detour plans, traffic signs and pavement marking plans. We specialize in transportation planning, design and operations. 7. Transportation engineering: Traffic Solutions services minimize congestion, improve street and highway safety, optimize property access and egress, accommodate pedestrians and vehicle traffic, combine mobility with aesthetics and find funding sources for projects. Alternate Solutions: Charging peak-hour tolls. Governments can open all restricted lanes on major commuting roads during peak hours. That would allow more people to travel per lane per hour than under current, heavily congested conditions. In Bhubaneswar, some roads near hospital, Raj Bhawan etc are normally restricted which can open valves to minimize congestion during peak hours. Greatly expanding public transit capacity. We should expand public transit capacity enough to shift so many people from cars to transit that there would be no more excess demand for roads during peak hours. But it has so many adoption constraints. Public Light Buses (PLBs), known as mini-buses, complement the standard dense bus lines, serving areas that are hard to reach efficiently. With the carrying capacity of 16 seats, PLBs are typically faster and more efficient with higher frequency and offer non-stop service. This mechanism is successfully deployed in cities to reduce traffic jam. Encouraging Cycling: The reduction in car use has already resulted in significant drop in CO2 emissions. Additional social benefits such as the encouragement of cycling through the integrated cycling facilities to be made. This has further contributed to cycling initiative “Greenwave”, and has reduced CO2 emissions by vast amount annually. Project Interzone: It suggests abandoning our traditional concept of linear time. It sounds like something out of a science fiction novel, and the organizers, in fact, came up with the concept through developing a fictional scenario that would eliminate in efficient old strategy but take a deeper look on real time and zone wise traffic basis concept for alternative tests. Project Executive Summary – Outcomes: Road Safety Strategy 2025 is similar to its predecessors in a number of ways. It retains the long-term vision of Towards Zero. A number of principles key to the strategy’s success have been aligned with international best practices in road safety. These principles include: Providing an inventory of proven and promising best practices to address key risk groups and contributing factors builds on the work of Road Safety Strategy 2020 with a flexible approach to allow for jurisdictions to implement road safety programs that meet their own needs. Vision Towards Zero - The safest roads in the world” Towards Zero is not a target to be achieved by a certain date; it is aspirational. This vision will continue beyond RSS 2025’s timeline and highlights the desire for the best road safety outcomes for all Canadian jurisdictions. Strategic Objectives: The following strategic objectives form the cornerstone on safer road users, road infrastructure and vehicles:
 • Raising public awareness and commitment to road safety • Improving communication, cooperation and collaboration among stakeholders • Enhancing legislation and enforcement • Improving road safety information in support of research and evaluation • Improving the safety of vehicles and road infrastructure • Leveraging technology and innovation Adopting a Safe System Approach: The Safe System Approach (SSA) is how many countries leading in road safety are achieving their vision of eliminating deaths and serious injuries. SSA contains the following principles: Ethics: human life and health are paramount and take priority over mobility and other objectives of the road traffic system (i.e., life and health can never be exchanged for other benefits within the society) Responsibility: providers and regulators of the road traffic system share responsibility with users Safety: road traffic systems should take account of human fallibility and minimize both the opportunities for errors and the harm done when they occur Mechanisms for change: providers and regulators must do their utmost to guarantee the safety of all citizens; they must cooperate with road users; and all three must be ready to change to achieve safety. It is recognized that Canadian jurisdictions will implement the SSA in a manner that is Appropriate to their environment Project Executive Summary - Metrics/Measuring Success: A 5-year Action Plan period should be adopted by the Government and the identified strategies within it address road safety issues covering education, enforcement, engineering and environmental issues. Central to this 5 year plan is the achievement of key targets set for year 2020 to make the country on par with world best practices in road safety. The first strategy is to : Enhance and Sustain Educational and Psychological Measures in Road Safety Education is foundation, platform and catalyst, that supports all programmes to bring about the desired changes in road safety behaviour, skills and attitude. 1 The key objective for Road Safety Education is to make drivers and other road users risk-averse and equipped with the appropriate knowledge and kills. Road users should be trained to self regulate their behaviour based on inherent risks in the road and traffic environment. 2 Road safety education is a life-long process, but it should begin with the young in school, tailoring its message to the audience to teach safe traffic habits from primary school to secondary school, so that safety becomes ingrained as part of the culture and practice of our children. The aim here is to inculcate in children and parents an understanding of the dangers within the traffic environment and how to practice safety as pedestrians and road users. 3 A systematic development and roll out of Road Safety Education in Government schools and other similar educational institutions should be mandatory. By the end of 2020 every primary aged child in the country should have received a minimum of 10 lessons of road safety education at every year of primary schooling. The training and delivery of RSE in secondary schools must commence soon. Seen time and time again when a spectacular crash occurs and the tragedy is kept in the press for days, a quick fix is implemented - traffic lights, better crossing facilities or whatever. Public opinion often requires, and gets, immediate responses to immediate problems, so the engineering or enforcement response is seen as the visible and preferred priority. Where community awareness is lacking it may be difficult to link investment in childhood and adolescence with the ‘downstream’ social problems that prevention investment aims to reduce. There is growing evidence that early intervention pays economic, social and health benefits in the long term, but there are few studies in RSE that show this. The measures used to determine the effectiveness of Road Safety Education programs are not, (and should not be), the same as the measures for engineering or enforcement initiatives. They are not directly comparable. The nature and application of learning means that the effect of an educational program may in some cases be immediate and in others, long term. We need to measure learning and application of learning - and apply educational assessment and evaluation techniques. We need to take into account that children learn in different ways and at different rates. We also need to take into account the potential negating effect of parents/caregivers and their behaviors and attitudes. Measures of the effectiveness of road safety education programs need to use a combination of qualitative and quantitative measures drawn from across the fields of education, health, enforcement and engineering. In the case of road safety outcomes, there may be a number of concurrent engineering and enforcement initiatives and education programs that contribute to the outcome. It is the synergy between a number of approaches or safety initiatives that reduces the risk exposure of children and young people and keeps road users safer. Remove one initiative, and the outcome may be quite negative. There is also the added constraint that to be effective, each approach may require different time periods between the intervention or program and the expected change in the population’s health and injury rates. Project Executive Summary - Long Term Impact: Long Term Impact: It is essential to develop tools designed to evaluate the impact of the expected Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) solutions on road safety, particularly in the context of the implementation of the National Traffic Management System. It is assumed that the level of road safety (as related to ITS services) will be mainly affected by the following factors, depending on the scope and type of implemented ITS solutions: - • features (factors) related to the road and the traffic organization (among others road class, geometric solutions and traffic layout solutions), • traffic features (among others speed, density, intensity, utilization of throughput), - road illumination, - weather conditions and the state of the road surface, - reliability of the physical layer (in terms of hardware and ICT), - features (factors) associated with the driver behaviour (i.e. driving speed and failure to adapt it to the road and traffic conditions. Some of model modules are discussed: • modules: - Module 1 – “Transmission of information and instructions for drivers”, • Module 2 – “Output to control the speed and traffic lanes”, • Module 3 – “Collecting data about the vehicles”, • Module 4 – “Event detection from the available resource data”, • Module 5 – “Collecting data on the journey”, • Module 6 – “Motorway Alarm Telephony + CB”, • Module 7 – “Video data”, • Module 8 – “Transmission of how busy MSA/Car Parks are”, • Module 9 – “Obtaining information on how busy MSA/Car Parks are”, • Module 10 – “Managing road lighting”, • Module 11 – “Dosing entry (Ramp Metering)”, • Module 12 – “Traffic lights on the roads”, • Module 13 – “Collecting weather data and the road surface condition data”, • Module 14 – “Noise measurement”, • Module 15 – “Air pollution measurement”, • Module 16 – “Transmission of information for motorists about the tunnel”, • Module 17 – “Collecting traffic data from the national road network”. – These modules will have a direct impact (e.g. by displaying information on traffic conditions, or a dynamic introduction of speed limits - variable contents signs) or indirect impact (e.g. by obtaining information about the weather conditions and the state of the road surface) on road safety. -According to the strategic objectives of the National Traffic Management System: - ITS systems should address the needs of their users; - requirements for the systems should take into account the real needs, rather than market trends, or the current capabilities of suppliers; - data exchange between the public sector significantly increases the efficiency of ITS investments; - experiences in other countries and the technology market are rapidly changing, hence the need for cooperation with the ITS sector, scientific community and other units of the road administration needs to be addressed. There is no scientific proof of how individual ITS devices influence the recipients, i.e. road users or the proper way to deploy these devices within road infrastructure. This gives us some freedom to choose functional, organizational, hardware and telecommunications solutions of these systems, which are characterized by a certain dissimilarity in how the information is provided to the end users (road users). To examine the impact of a single ITS system or service, based on the statistics of time period-based road accidents, would require long-term studies, assuming that other technical and traffic conditions on the road have not changed significantly. Long term studies of 2-3 years duration may give some tangible results. Project Executive Summary – Highlights: These are some of the clever concepts to make the project unique: To engage the community and help change unsafe behaviour on the roads, we develop education and awareness campaigns. Towards Zero highlights the human element of the road toll and encourages all road users to change the way we think about road safety. The Slow Down campaign encourages drivers to reduce thier speed, because it's difficult to know what is up ahead. Our Mobile Drug Testing (MDT) campaign warns drivers that NSW Police can test them for drugs anytime, anywhere, there’s no escaping it. Ride to Live gets to the heart of what keeps motorcyclists safe: making good decisions. The campaign gives riders useful information about the risks they face on the road and how they can best manage them. Don't trust your tired self focuses on drivers before they get behind the wheel, helping to reduce the number of fatigue-related crashes. The drink driving campaign is about making positive choices to get home safely after a night out, reinforcing the safety message that if you are having a few drinks, driving is not an option. No mobile phone usage during driving campaign has been extended to highlight the serious consequences of using your mobile phone illegally while driving. Taking your eyes off the road for just two seconds could cost you, or those you care about, everything. Look Out Before You Step Out aims to improve pedestrian safety, particularly on higher risk urban roads. Upgrades to pedestrian safety infrastructure include changes to traffic signal timing to protect pedestrians from turning cars and more high pedestrian activity 40km/h speed zones. Be Truck Aware highlights the importance of taking extra care around trucks, especially if you live, work or travel in Sydney. The Be Bus Aware campaign features Bus Safety Week, highlighting the importance of bus safety for all road users. Buses are large, heavy vehicles and can’t stop quickly. Go Together helps drivers, bicycle riders and pedestrians understand how changes to the law will help everyone respect each other's space and stay safe. They're counting on you encourages the correct use of child car seats and raises awareness that many seats are not fitted correctly. It also includes our new video on driveway safety featuring TV personality Scott Cam. Road Rules Awareness Week helps anyone whose knowledge of the road rules isn't as thorough as it used to be. During the annual week, road users are encouraged to phone a special hotline to have their questions answered by road safety experts. Slow down and give us space aims to improve safety for those who work at the roadside responding to crashes and breakdowns.
What are your objectives? 
Awareness through Campaign a Rally on Road Safety Programme by printing & distributing leaflets, Booklets, plaque cards, banners, posters, quoting valuable slogans and symbolic eye caps.
• To arrange Seminar, Workshops, Rallies, Training and Competition
• To organize Training-cum-Demonstration Programme for the School and College Students as well as light motor vehicle drivers
• To organize competition: Essay, Debate, Slogan, Quiz, and Poster on Road Safety themes among the school and college students.
• To organize Street Plays, Daskathia & other Lok-Natya as well as slide Projector show, Road Safety & Oil, Gas Conservation & Safety Film show to display remedial precautions & measures on road safety them in different places.
• To prepare & publish guide books on Road Safety and Traffic Control and to disseminate these among the road users for their better knowledge.
• To Organize Traffic Control Training-cum-free pollution check-up camp for the School & College students.
• To Organize Sensitization Workshop on Safe Transportation of School Students for Teachers and Quiz Competition for students on the theme of Road Safety.
• Wall Painting containing different road safety messages for awareness of school students as well as parents of different school walls
• To adopt Plantation Programme on road side to save the roads from soil erosion and eradication of climate change.
• To make Passangers Restshed on the road side.
• To make stickers on Road Safety & distribute among the school students and cycle riders. Auto etc.
Who was/is your target audience? 
Describe the characteristics of your target audience 
Target Groups : • Project aims to cover 100 surveyed village & town of Odisha for the Road Safety & Traffic Control Programme to facilitate more than more 20,000 people. • Road Safety & Traffic Control Training for 40 School & 20 College students. • Training Programme for 200 Light motor vehicle drivers. • Sensitization Workshop on Safe Transportation of School Students for 200Teachers and Quiz Competition for students on the theme of Road Safety
How many people did you reach/have you reached? 
List the actions you carried/are carrying out 
Date 
Wednesday, 1 September, 2021 to Thursday, 31 March, 2022
Name of action 

Odia, Hindi, English

Is there a plan for continuing these activities in the coming years? 
Yes
How did you disseminate/are you disseminating results or how did you promote/are you promoting your initiative? 
By creating awareness and activities with cooperation district administration, Public Representative, NGOs etc.
How did you evaluate/are you evaluating the success of your action? 
• By suitable questionnaires • Demonstration • Audio-Visual Show
Who carried/carries out the evaluation activities? 
External evaluation
Internal evaluation
Name of the external evaluator 
Regional Transport Authority: Cuttack
When did/will you carry out the evaluation? 
Before, after and continuous monitoring
How many groups did you evaluate/have you evaluated? 
Number of interventions groups 
1000
Number of control groups 
10
Please list the indicators you use to measure success 
success in research competitive tenders - papers accepted in peer-review scientific journals and conferences - internal and external evaluators - website visits - Google search appearance results
Comparison test with Hamar Between ISI Marked and Ordinary Helmet
>Display Audio Visual Show "DNA_Why are Helmet without ISI Mark Dangerous Your Life" video collected from ZEE NEWSYoutube:https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/multisite/ersc/content/dnawhy-are-helmet-without-isi-mark-dangerous-your-life_en
Please describe the evaluation tools you use (i.e. surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.) 
Multi-criteria evaluations and international benchmarking
Pre-Survey Black Spot area with cooperation by administration and technical assistance
Intraction with local area peoples,drivers,Bike Riders
Discussion with focus groups and the spot of training/awareness programmes